Double Cross

aussiegritandtheiceman:

Well when Mclaren had the full backing of Mercedes you won nought so…

jagolevert:

I just stumbled on this video again and, you know, I’d hate for someone to miss out on it. (x)

Well, I’ll be damned.

amjayes:

"I was so angry, I just kept pushing. Then the lights went out and I woke up in hospital, on a drip in a bed packed with ice." - Nigel Mansell on Dallas 1984.

heughanalwaysinmydreams:

Marussia F1 Team.

garypatrickmannion:

Bianchi’s garage at Sochi

Tous Avec Jules. photo credit: unknown

garypatrickmannion:

Bianchi’s garage at Sochi

Tous Avec Jules. photo credit: unknown

>$80M USD per year

HOLY FUCKING SCROOGE MCDUCK

amotorsportsblog:

Less polished reflections on Jules Bianchi’s career, his awful accident, and personal memories of other tragedies in motorsport.

formulaeen:

amjayes:

“This [new] generation of F1 drivers is not used to seeing big accidents. Bianchi’s accident makes me very angry, because I have the feeling of being back in the 80s when this type of accident happened every two or three races. This brings me back very bad memories” - Alain Prost

People criticised Prost for not wanting to race in the rain-soaked 1989 Australian Grand Prix. Apart from the fact he had nothing to race for, having already clinched the championship, he thought the conditions were far too dangerous. He had good reasons. In 1982 during a torrential qualifying sessions at Hockenheim, Prost was involved in an accident that ended the career of Didier Pironi. Pironi, unable to see Prost’s Renault through all the spray, ran into the rear of the slow moving Renault and was launched into the air (in a similar way to Webber’s accident at Valencia not long ago). Didier’s legs were destroyed, was lucky for them not to have been amputated, and never raced again. The accident was also very similar to the crash that killed Didier’s team mate, Gilles Villeneuve, earlier in the season. In a complete contrast to the FIA’s and FOM’s practice of suppressing any footage of Bianchi’s crash, the accident and post-accident attempts to revive Gilles’ were televised world wide in news reports.
In the 1980’s drivers wanted to race in poor conditions because they were so accustomed to such awful crashes that the weather was rarely the key event in a driver’s death or severe injuring. In the 00’s, drivers want to race in poor conditions because of the perceived invincibility of modern technology. Robert Kubica survived his horror crash at Montreal, even Massa survived his freak accident at Hungary that left his life in the balance.
In the early 90’s, there were comments that the large length of time since a death in Formula One despite all the major accidents (think Nige’s fractured spine, Berger’s and Piquet’s severe accidents at Tumberello, Donnelly’s massive accident he some how survived at Jerez) had made driver’s, specifically the younger ones, start to feel invincible. It took Imola in 1994 to throw that out the window and cause a serious rethink of safety in Formula One. If anything good can come out of Bianchi’s crash, hopefully it is a renewed investigation into the safety of Formula One.
To quote Michael Schumacher:

I hope we learn from this. I think there is a lot to learn from and we have to use this. And things like this, they shouldn’t happen without taking the experience from it.

formulaeen:

amjayes:

“This [new] generation of F1 drivers is not used to seeing big accidents. Bianchi’s accident makes me very angry, because I have the feeling of being back in the 80s when this type of accident happened every two or three races. This brings me back very bad memories” - Alain Prost

People criticised Prost for not wanting to race in the rain-soaked 1989 Australian Grand Prix. Apart from the fact he had nothing to race for, having already clinched the championship, he thought the conditions were far too dangerous. He had good reasons. In 1982 during a torrential qualifying sessions at Hockenheim, Prost was involved in an accident that ended the career of Didier Pironi. Pironi, unable to see Prost’s Renault through all the spray, ran into the rear of the slow moving Renault and was launched into the air (in a similar way to Webber’s accident at Valencia not long ago). Didier’s legs were destroyed, was lucky for them not to have been amputated, and never raced again. The accident was also very similar to the crash that killed Didier’s team mate, Gilles Villeneuve, earlier in the season. In a complete contrast to the FIA’s and FOM’s practice of suppressing any footage of Bianchi’s crash, the accident and post-accident attempts to revive Gilles’ were televised world wide in news reports.

In the 1980’s drivers wanted to race in poor conditions because they were so accustomed to such awful crashes that the weather was rarely the key event in a driver’s death or severe injuring. In the 00’s, drivers want to race in poor conditions because of the perceived invincibility of modern technology. Robert Kubica survived his horror crash at Montreal, even Massa survived his freak accident at Hungary that left his life in the balance.

In the early 90’s, there were comments that the large length of time since a death in Formula One despite all the major accidents (think Nige’s fractured spine, Berger’s and Piquet’s severe accidents at Tumberello, Donnelly’s massive accident he some how survived at Jerez) had made driver’s, specifically the younger ones, start to feel invincible. It took Imola in 1994 to throw that out the window and cause a serious rethink of safety in Formula One. If anything good can come out of Bianchi’s crash, hopefully it is a renewed investigation into the safety of Formula One.

To quote Michael Schumacher:

I hope we learn from this. I think there is a lot to learn from and we have to use this. And things like this, they shouldn’t happen without taking the experience from it.

for-one-last-time:

My thoughts and prayers are now also with the family and friends of former F1 driver, Andrea De Cesaris. What a sad day for Motorsport. RIP.

Holy fucking shit. :(